Lustau, Pedro Ximenex

Lustau

NV
Sherry

Pedro Ximénez grapes are laid out in the sun after picking until they are practically raisins. After that the fermentation starts slowly and its halted to maintain all the natural sugars. The resulting wine ages in for 12 years in contact with the air in Jerez de la Frontera.

Ebony in colour with iodine highlights. The aromas are reminiscent of figs, raisins and dates. Enormously sweet, velvety and soft on the palate, well balanced, with a very long finish.

Producer
Region
Variety
Pedro Ximenex
Alcohol-abv
17.5%
Add to shopping cart
£15
Sherry

Sherry

Sherry, a wine which is truly unique in the world, is exclusively produced in the wine-growing region of Jerez, which is situated in a triangle of land formed by the towns of Jerez de la Frontera, Sanlúcar de Barrameda and El Puerto de Santa María. Its Production Zone takes in the municipal boundaries of Jerez, El Puerto, Sanlúcar, Chiclana, Chipiona, Puerto Real, Rota, Trebuejena and Lebrija.

The region´s oenological tradition goes back over more than 3,000 years and it has developed its own distinctive and exclusive elaboration method. Its unique climatic conditions are ideal for the cultivation of three varieties of grape: the Palomino, which is used to produce the drier types of Sherry, and the Pedro Ximénez and Moscatel, which are used for the sweeter varieties.

Spain

Grape vines have been grown on the Iberian Peninsula since at least 3000 B.C., although it was not until 1000 B.C. that winemaking began here in earnest – a skill brought by Phoenician traders from the eastern Mediterranean. Today, Spain is home to more vines than any other country on Earth, and has a national wine output exceeded only by France and Italy.

All seventeen of Spain's administrative regions (communidades autónomas) produce wine to some extent, including the Canary Islands and Balearic Islands. The greatest concentration of vineyards is in Castilla-La Mancha, but the finest and most famous wines come from Galicia (Rias Baixas), Catalonia (Cava and Priorat), Andalucia (Sherry), Castilla y Leon (Rueda, Toro and Ribera del Duero) and of course Rioja.

Geography and climate together play a fundamental role in defining Spain's many wine styles. From cool, green Galicia and the snow-capped Pyrenees in the north, via the parched central plateau, to sandy, sunny Andalucia in the south, the Spanish landscape is very diverse. The country spans seven degrees of latitude (36°N to 43°N), leaving 500 miles (800km) between its Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts.

The key red-wine varieties, in order of acreage, are Tempranillo, Bobal, Garnacha and Monastrell. The leading white-wine varieties are Airen, Viura/Macabeo and Palomino and Albarino. 'International' varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc are becoming more and more popular in Spain, and their plantings are rising in various Spanish regions. Along with the most popular varieties, there are regional specialties, such as Hondarrabi Zuri in the Basque Country, Marmajuelo in the Canary Islands and Zalema in Andalucia.