Castello di Fonterutoli, Castello Fonterutoli Chianti Classico 2006

Castello di Fonterutoli

2006
Chianti Classico
SCORES Wine Spectator - 91 pts James Suckling - 93 pts Robert Parker - 90 pts Wine Enthusiast - 92 pts Decanter - 4 Stars Petersham Cellar has just secured a small parcel of the award winning Chianti Classico Gran Selezione 2006 from the Mazzei Family Estate Castello di Fonterutolli in Tuscany. This is a unique opportunity to buy some of this highly sought after wine, it is proving very popular at the Estate and there isn't much left so we wanted to make sure our customers are offered this wine before it runs out. It is stunning, drinking well now but can also be cellared for 5+ years due to its fantastic structure and balance. The most representative wine of the Fonterutoli estate has been created with seven different Sangiovese clones blended with a small amount of other local grape varieties. This powerful and elegant wine is an excellent expression of the four different terroirs of the Fonterutoli estate.It has been aged for 16 months in small French oak barrels and boasts excellent structure and smoothness. Bold and classy.
Variety
Sangiovese, Malvasia Nera, Colorino
Alcohol-abv
13,50 %
Reviews

Wine Enthusiast 92 Points, Antonio Galloni 90 Points, Wine Spectator 91 Points, James Suckling 93 Points

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£50

Ratings

92 Points Wine Enthusiast

90 Points Antonio Galloni

91 Points Wine Spectator

93 Points James Suckling

Tuscany

Tuscany

One of Italy’s most preferred by wine connoisseurs, the region of Tuscany is probably only rivalled for its prestige by Piedmont, in the north. Tuscany contains a number of very fine DOC and DOCG appellations within its geographical borders, and is also home to the Super Tuscans. By far the most relevant Tuscan appellation is Chianti Classico, where some incredible wines that compete at the highest level are produced. Many of these amazing Chiantis will age for over twenty years. Chianti shares Tuscany with Brunello di Montalcino DOCG and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano DOCG, both of which produce wines of great quality. Brunello is a local variety of the Sangiovese grape. The warm temperatures coming off the coast, combined with the cool breezes from the hills, create a multitude of microclimates.

DOCG and DOC

IGT: Toscana; Colli della Toscana Centrale; Vermentino di Toscana

DOC: Barco Reale di Carmignano; Bolgheri; Chianti; Elba; Maremma Toscana; Rosso di Montalcino; Val d’Arno di Sopra DOC;Vin Santo del Chianti; Vin Santo del Carmignano

DOCG:Brunello di Montalcino; Chianti Classico; Chianti Classico Riserva; Carmignano; Morellino di Scansano; Vernaccia di San Gimignano; Vino Nobile di Montepulciano

Tuscany accounts for over thirty DOC and half a dozen of DOCG wines. In addition to the great, well-known and appreciated reds, the local production includes a few distinguishable whites, the most notable among them being, without doubt, the Vernaccia di San Gimignano. Other delicious whites include the Bianco d'Elba, Bianco di Bolgheri, Vermentino and Bianco di Pitigliano.

Grape varieties

One of the most well known is Sangiovese the mainstay in all but one of Tuscany's seven red-wine DOCGs. In Montalcino it goes by the name Brunello, hence the name Brunello di Montalcino; in Vino Nobile di Montepulciano it is locally known as Prugnolo Gentile. Chianti, famed the world over, also features Sangiovese, as well as permitting the addition of small amounts of Canaiolo and Colorino, and international gems Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. As well as being famed for its reds, Tuscany produces some distinguished whites, one of which has achieved DOCG status: Vernaccia di San Gimignano.

Chianti Classico

Chianti Classico

This small wine-region produces perhaps some of the best-known and appreciated wines from Tuscany. Wine has been produced in this area for over 2000 years, since Etruscan time. This Tuscan region was named Chianti and recognized as a wine-region since 13th century. In 1716 Cosimo III, Grand Duke of Tuscany, officially delimited the Chianti production zone: an area lying between the cities of Florence and Siena where the homonymous wine was produced and was already enjoying great success. At that time the wine called “Chianti” was made in the territory called “Chianti”. The trademark always found on bottles of Chianti Classico is the Black rooster, historic symbol of the Chianti Military League and among other things depicted by famous artist Giorgio Vasari on the ceiling of the Salone dei Cinquecento at Palazzo Vecchio in Florence.

The Chianti Classico appellation covers an area of approximate 260 km2 (about 100 square miles) between the city of Florence to the north and Siena to the south. The four communes of Castellina in Chianti, Gaiole in Chianti, Greve in Chianti and Radda in Chianti are located entirely within the boundaries of the Classico area with parts of Barberino Val d'Elsa, San Casciano in Val di Pesa and Tavarnelle Val di Pesa in the province of Florence as well as Castelnuovo Berardenga and Poggibonsi in the province of Siena included within the permitted boundaries of Chianti Classico. The soil and geography of this subregion can be quite varied, with altitudes ranging from 250 to 610 m (820 to 2,000 feet), and rolling hills producing differing macroclimates. There are two main soil types in the area: a weathered sandstone known as alberese and a bluish-gray chalky marlstone known as galestro

There are three tiers within the Chianti Classico appellation: Annata, Riserva and Gran Selezione. Chianti Classico Annata requires a minimumum of 10 months of ageing in wood and bottle before release. Riserva wines must be aged for 24 months before commercial release. A Chianti Classico Gran Selezione must be made from a single estate and have been aged for a full 30 months.