Veuve Clicquot Yellow Label

Veuve Cliquot

NV
Champagne

Yellow Label is the signature Champagne of Maison Veuve ClicquotThe nose provides vibrant notes of white fruits and raisins, then of vanilla and later of brioche. The first sip delivers all the freshness and forcefulness so typical of Yellow Label followed by a symphony of fruit tastes. Here is a true member of the powerful Brut family, well structured, admirably vinous.

One of the 17 Grande Marque Houses from Champagne. Dating back to 1772 the house has a rich and varied history. 'Veuve' translates as widow and is a reference to Barbe Nicole Ponsardin who ran the company from a very young age due to her husband's early death.

Region
Variety
Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir, Chardonnay
Alcohol-abv
12%
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£49.99
Champagne

Champagne

Situated 90 miles north-east of Paris, one of the most northerly latitudes in the wine world, Champagne lies over a chalk plain (a major influence of the terroir) and is split by the River Marne. Vineyards are literally dotted all over the region, but the cities of Epernay and Reims are the main hubs, where the major producers have their maison. The region consists of 5 main regions, split into 17 sub-regions. Montage de Reims, Côte des Blancs, Vallée de la Marne, Côte des Sézanne and The Aube. The majority (over two thirds) of the vineyards are found in the Marne valley.

With its continental cool climate, the growing season is rarely warm enough to ripen grapes to the levels required for standard winemaking. Even in temperate years, Champagne's grapes still bear the hallmark acidity of a marginal climate, and it was only the discovery of secondary fermentation that provided a wine style capable of harnessing – and even embracing – this tartness.

Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier and Chardonnay are the primary grape varieties used to make Champagne – a recipe used for sparkling wines across the world. It is a little-known fact that four other varieties are also permitted for use in Champagne and are still employed today, albeit in tiny quantities. They are Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris, Petit Meslier and Arbane.

Depending on exactly how a Champagne is made, can take any one of various forms. The key Champagne styles differ in their color, sweetness, base grape varieties, and whether they are the product of a single vintage or several (Non-Vintage). The whites may be either Blanc de Noirs (made from black-skinned grapes), Blanc de Blancs (made from green-skinned grapes) or just plain Blanc (made from any combination of the permitted varieties). Pink Champagne Rosé is made either by adding red wine to a white blend or sometimes by fermenting the juice in contact with the skins. Grand Cru Champagnes and Premier Cru Champagnes are those made from the region's very finest and highest-rated vineyards.

All Champagne must spend at least 12 months aging on its lees - the spent yeast cells from the second fermentation. An extended period on lees beyond this can have a marked effect on the yeasty characteristics of the final wine. Non-vintage Champagnes must mature in bottle for a minimum of 15 months in total before release (i.e. an extra 3 months after the yeast sediment is removed at disgorgement) though in practice 2 to 3 years is a more typical figure. Vintage wines must spend 36 months in bottle before being sent to market, though most are released after 4 to 10 years.