Coulee de Serrant, Les Vieux Clos 2018

Coulee de Serrant - Nicolas Joly

2018
Savenniers

"Les Vieux Clos" by Nicolas Joly is an intense and elegant French made with 100% Chenin Blanc, pure and faithful expression of the Loire.
The nose has distinct floral and yellow fruits scents, with spiced notes. The taste is full bodied and intense, powerful and elegant.
Vines are on soils which are are primarily made of schists and particles of quartz as well as sand.
The yields are of 3/3.5 tons per hectare.
Production: approximately 15 000 bottles

Region
Variety
Chenin Blanc
Alcohol-abv
15%
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£49
Loire

Loire

The Loire Valley is a key wine region in western France. It follows the course of the Loire river on its long journey through the heart of France, from the inland hills of Auvergne to the plains on the French Atlantic coast near Nantes.

In wine-making and viticulture, diversity is one of the region's key strengths; the wine styles made here range from the light, tart Muscadet and sweet, honeyed Bonnezeaux to the sparkling whites of Vouvray and juicy, tannic reds of Chinon and Saumur. without forgetting the well reknown Sauvigignon of Sancerre and Pouilly-Fume.

The key white-wine grape varieties used to make Loire Valley whites are Sauvignon Blanc, Chenin Blanc, Melon de Bourgogne

The number one red-wine variety is unquestionably Cabernet Franc, the grape behind the reds of Chinon, Saumur and Bourgueil. Lighter-bodied red wines are made from Pinot Noir, Malbec (known here as Côt) and Gamay.

France

France – the home of Bordeaux, Burgundy, Loire and Champagne – is arguably the world's most important wine-producing country. For centuries, it has produced wine in greater quantity – and of reportedly greater quality – than any other nation. Wine is ingrained in French culture at almost every level of society; it is the drink of both the elite and the common people, and a key symbol in Roman Catholicism, France's majority religion.

The diversity of French wine is due, in part, to the country's wide range of climates. Champagne, its most northerly region, has one of the coolest climates anywhere in the wine-growing world – in stark contrast to the warm, dry Rhone Valley 350 miles (560km) away in the southeast. Bordeaux, in the southwest, has a maritime climate heavily influenced by the Atlantic ocean to its west and the various rivers that wind their way between its vineyards. Far from any oceanic influence, eastern regions such as Burgundy and Alsace have a continental climate, with warm, dry summers and cold winters. In France's deep south, Provence and Languedoc-Roussillon enjoy a definitively Mediterranean climate, characterized by hot summers and relatively mild winters.

France's appellation system was created in the early 20th century and has since been imitated in many other countries. This complex system of laws ultimately defines each wine region and its boundaries and imposes strict rules around winemaking practices. Protecting the names of French wines and guaranteeing the quality and provenance of the products themselves are its key objectives. No other country has developed its appellation system to such an extent; as of 2012, there were more than 450 controlled appellations under the AOC titles and a further 150 Vin de Pays/IGP titles.